Tornado

04/07/2022 – SVdP Disaster Services Corporation Update

04/07/2022 – SVdP Disaster Services Corporation Update 940 788 SVDP USA

Besides responding to natural and manmade disasters, the role of SVdP’s Disaster Services Corporation is to educate SVdP Councils and Conferences about different types of severe weather. Be alert, so you can be prepared for spring storms!

Tornado Watch

A tornado watch means that tornadoes are possible in and near the watch area. Review and discuss your emergency plans and check supplies and your safe room. Be ready to act quickly if a watch is issued. Acting early helps save lives! Watches are issued by the Storm Prediction Center, and a watch area is typically large, covering numerous counties or even states.

Tornado Warning

A tornado warning means one has been sighted or indicated by weather radar. There is imminent danger to life and property. Move to an interior room on the lowest floor of a sturdy shelter. Avoid windows. If you are in a mobile home, a vehicle or outdoors, move to the closest substantial shelter and cover your head to avoid flying debris. Local NWS offices issue warnings. Warnings typically encompass a much smaller area, around the size of a city or small county. Warnings are issued when a tornado is spotted on the ground or identified by a forecaster on radar.

Severe Thunderstorm Watch

A severe thunderstorm watch means that atmospheric conditions are favorable for severe thunderstorm development. The severe thunderstorm watch outlines an area where an organized threat of severe thunderstorms is expected generally during a three- to six-hour period. Severe thunderstorm watches are issued by the Storm Prediction Center after consultation with local National Weather Service offices and can cover several counties to several states at a time.

During a severe thunderstorm watch, it is important to think about where you will be during the lifetime of the watch. If you are outdoors, develop a Weather Ready plan that includes directions to the nearest lightning and hail-proof shelter. Keep in mind that severe hail can smash car windshields, cause injuries and, in the extreme, punch holes in roofs.

Please Follow DSC

Our website: www.svdpdisaster.org
On Twitter @svdpusadisaster
On Facebook @DisasterServicesCorp

Disaster Services Corporation Update Regarding Recent Tornado Outbreak

Disaster Services Corporation Update Regarding Recent Tornado Outbreak 940 788 SVDP USA

Dear Vincentians,

Disaster Services Corporation (DSC) is coordinating its response to the recent devastating tornado outbreak in six states with its South Central, Midwest, North Central, Mideast, and Southeast Disaster Representatives which are part of the DSC Board’s Disaster Operations Committee. DSC is monitoring to meet the needs of survivors by working through state, local, and tribal governments and is actively coordinating with affected states to address unmet needs. We are on daily VOAD calls and conducting Coordination Calls with the Disaster Reps in the regions where the tornados hit.

DSC works through its Disaster Operations Committee and its Regional Committee Members for all disaster relief and recovery efforts. Our Regional Disaster Reps work with their local Vincentian Councils and Conferences, the local Diocese, and the state VOADs to determine the unmet needs of the impacted disaster areas. Disaster recovery takes years, and it is important to have funding for the second stages of disasters like the Parish Recovery Assistance Centers (PRACs) which help disaster survivors get registered for state and federal benefits and where Vincentians can provide spiritual and emotional care. DSC will be providing Rapid Response Grants to Councils that have unmet needs and are working to help their Diocese recover from this very tragic series of tornados.

Please continue to pray for all the families impacted by disasters during this Advent Season and if possible, please volunteer or donate to the relief efforts.

DSC Response Actions 

  • Damage assessment teams, additional staff, and resources are positioned and ready to deploy to Kentucky or any other affected areas.
  • DSC is in contact with state VOADs and state emergency management officials as tornado damage reports come in from Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, and Tennessee.
  • Working with the National Council to ensure funds are available for Rapid Response Grants.

Staying Weather Aware and Safe Before, During, and After Tornadoes 

Residents from east-central Mississippi to extreme southwestern Virginia should stay vigilant as this storm system moves east. Damaging wind gusts and a few tornadoes will be possible, mainly early in the day. Isolated strong wind gusts cannot be ruled out over parts of the Mid-Atlantic during the late afternoon and evening.

In any emergency, always follow the instructions given by state, local or tribal emergency management officials. Follow these tips to stay safe after a tornado.

  • Stay out of the area if possible. Emergency workers may be assisting people or cleaning up debris. You can help them by staying off the roads and out of the way.
  • Enter areas that have sustained damaged only after your local officials have said it is safe to do so. Always follow the direction of your local officials.
  • If you suspect any damage to your home, shut off the electrical power, natural gas, and propane tanks to avoid fire, electrocution or explosions, if you know how to do so safely.
  • Do not touch downed power lines or any objects that are in contact with downed lines. If you see a downed power line or other electrical hazard, report it to the police and the utility company.
  • If you see frayed wiring or sparks, or if there is an odor of something burning, you should immediately shut off the electrical system at the main circuit breaker if you have not done so already.
  • If you smell gas or suspect a leak, turn off the main gas valve, open all windows and leave the house immediately. Notify the gas company, the police or fire departments, or State Fire Marshal’s office. Do not turn on the lights, light matches, smoke, or do anything that could cause a spark. Do not return to your house until your local officials say it is safe to do so.
  • Be careful when cleaning up. Wear protective clothing, including a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, work gloves, and sturdy thick-soled shoes. Do not try to remove heavy debris by yourself. Use an appropriate mask if cleaning mold or other debris. People with asthma and other lung conditions and/or immune suppression should not enter buildings with indoor water leaks or mold growth that can be seen or smelled. Children should not take part in disaster cleanup work.

Avoid Carbon Monoxide Poisoning:

If you lost power, avoid carbon monoxide poisoning and fires.

  • Use a Generator Safely! Never use a generator inside a home, basement, shed or garage, even if doors and windows are open. Keep generators far away from windows, doors, and vents that could allow carbon monoxide to come indoors.
  • Grills, camp stoves or other gasoline, propane, natural gas or charcoal burning devices should never be used inside a home, garage, basement, crawlspace, or any partially enclosed area. These should only be used outdoors and at least 20 feet away from windows.
  • Never use a gas stovetop or oven to heat your home.
  • For additional safety tips before, during or after a tornado visit https://www.ready.gov/tornadoes.

Contact Us

If you have any questions, please contact Disaster Services Corporation:

  • DSC Media Point of Contact: Elizabeth Disco-Shearer, Chief Executive Officer at (214) 717-1802 or at ldisco@svdpdisaster.org
  • Vincentian Support and Operations: Kevin Peach, Chief Operating Officer at (202) 924-6212 or at kpeach@svdpdisaster.org

Follow Us

Follow DSC on social media at:  @svdpusadisaster on Twitter, @DisasterServicesCorp Facebook, , and via @disastersericescorp on LinkedIn.

DSC Mission

To model the charism of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul by providing quality programs and services to families and communities impacted by natural and manmade disasters across this great nation.

In Service,

Elizabeth Disco-Shearer
Chief Executive Officer
Disaster Service Corporation

Disaster Services Update

Disaster Services Update 2000 1600 SVDP USA

Disaster Services Corporation (DSC) has been incredibly busy this year, responding to the devastating winter storms, wildfires, floods, tornados, and hurricanes which have compounded the suffering of Americans who are dealing with the second year of a deadly pandemic.

DSC, while having a modest team, has had a major impact in Vincentian communities nationwide. More than ever, DSC has focused their relief efforts on supporting SVdP Councils and Conferences, providing hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash cards, tarpaulins, tents, generators, hygiene kits, hotel stays, food commodities, and disaster case work.

Elizabeth Disco-Shearer, Chief Executive Officer, recently visited the Council of Nashville, Tennessee to tour the devastation from the catastrophic fall floods in Waverly, TN and worked with the Nashville Council, local government officials, and partners on standing up DSC’s national recognized recovery program, House in the Box.

Two months ago, one of the strongest hurricanes ever to make landfall in the United States hit Louisiana and then traveled from LA to PA, NY, NJ, and other eastern states. Hurricane Ida killed 115 people. Kevin Peach, Chief Operating Officer, visited Louisiana to answer the call for support from the Archdiocesan Council of New Orleans and the Council of Houma-Thibodaux. He visited several key locations, met with FEMA and state leadership, and joined partners in recovery planning for the region. Currently, Vincentians across the Southeast and North Central Regions have come to the aid of their fellow Vincentians in manning four Parish Recovery Assistance Centers (PRACs) across Louisiana. They are providing cash cards, handing out tarpaulins, and registering survivors for FEMA assistance.

Anthony Pluchino, Chief Program Officer, continues to lead the State of Oregon with the Disaster Case Management Program (DCMP). He visited Oregon and met with the ODHS management, state sponsored DCMs, Catholic Charites DCMs, Glide Revitalization DCMs, and Santiam Service Integration team. In addition, he met with leaders of the community and LTRGs to discuss programs and special projects that can help the survivors recover in the community. Anthony shared his experience on the devastation that he witnessed from the wildfires. At some of the sites he visited, there was nothing left standing except for a stone fireplace or chimney. Acres of trees burnt from the fire have been cut down and trucked away. Since the trees have been cut down, there is growing concern of potential mudslides. At times, Anthony reports that it was hard to breathe because of the smoke still hanging over the mountains. The total Value of Services provided to date is in excess of $ 250,000. Our partners are working very closely with the LTRGs to obtain much needed resources for the survivors.

Eastern Region

  • NJ Hurricane Ida
  • PA Hurricane Ida
  • WV Floods

Mideast Region

  • KY Floods

Southeastern Region

  • TN Floods
  • FL Hurricane Ida
  • GA Hurricane Ida
  • LA Hurricane Ida

South Central

  • TX Winter Storm

Western Region

  • CA Wild Fires
  • NV Wild Fires

Please keep all of the disaster survivors across the nation, as well as DSC’s staff and volunteers in your prayers.

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